Writer. Trouble-Maker. Mango Enthusiast.

6th April 2014

Photo reblogged from FREE THINKER SOUL REBEL with 49 notes

artafrica:

Vintage postcard, circa 1900, Benin Republic

artafrica:

Vintage postcard, circa 1900, Benin Republic

Source: artafrica

2nd April 2014

Photo reblogged from This is Africa, our Africa. with 670 notes

fotojournalismus:

Nuba, Sudan
Kazuyoshi Nomachi


Black hair is beautiful

fotojournalismus:

Nuba, Sudan

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

Black hair is beautiful

Source: fotojournalismus

28th March 2014

Quote with 15 notes

What have we done with what we have done?
— Earl Lovelace

Tagged: Trinidadwritercaribbeanreclaimingrebellioncultureresistancejouvayism

28th March 2014

Photo reblogged from The Àse Fountain with 7 notes

theasefountain:

Zak Ove - Speaker People

theasefountain:

Zak Ove - Speaker People

Tagged: zak oveartafro futurismtrinidad

Source: harriselliott

28th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from FREE THINKER SOUL REBEL with 1,742 notes

dynamicafrica:

ICONIC WOMEN: The Mino of Dahomey or the Dahomey ‘Amazon’ Warriors/Dahomey Amazons.

From the late 17th century until the end of the 19th century, the Kingdom of Dahomey in the what is today the West African nation of Benin (sandwiched between Nigeria on the east and Togo to their west) an incredible regiment made up of only women, from within the Fon community, challenged and refuted gender norms by occupying spaces usually reserved for men. 

This all-women Fon army was originally established by Dahomian king King Houegbadja, the third king of Dahomeny, who ruled from 1645 to 1685, with the intention of having these women serve as elephant hunters known as ‘gbeto’. Later, during Houegbadja’s son King Agadja reign during the early 1700s he developed the gbeto into an established bodyguard and warrior unit who became known as the Mino meaning ‘our mothers’ in Fon - a name given to them by the men’s army of Dahomey. During this time, the Mino gained one of their first major successes in being part of the Dahomey army that defeated the neighbouring kingdom of Savi in 1727. Their incorporation into the army was done to increase the size of the Dahomey military, thus appearing larger and more intimidating to their opponents.

In King Ghezo’s time, between 1818 to 1858, great emphasis was put on Dahomey’s army and military units, perhaps due to the growing threat of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the threat that neighbouring ethnic groups may have posed as a result of it. As a result, King Ghezo poured much of his resources into developing the Dahomian army, including the Mino, increasing their budget, formalizing their structure and training, and arming them with guns obtained from the Dutch through trade.

It is said that by the mid-19th century there were between 1,000-6,000 women in the Mino unit which comprised of both free Dahomian women and women who may have been taken as captives during war. Women in the Mino, sometimes referred to as ahosi (the king’s wives) were not permitted to marry or have children as the were considered wives of the king. This allowed the women to obtain positions of great power and influence as they were highly revered in Dahomian within the army - especially for their braver, and within society as well.

As European colonial forces began to move more aggressively throughout Africa in the 1800s, French forces on colonial campaigns in West Africa placed increasing pressure on the Dahomian Kingdom leading to an outbreak of war between French and Dahomian forces in 1890. The first Franco-Dahomian War broke out in that year with the Dahomey Army led by anti-colonialist King Behanzin. Part of the French forces consisted of Tirailleurs - French-trained Senegalese and Gabonese soldiers who had been recruited due to their countries being colonized by France. Despite the Dahomian army being greater in number, they were ill-equipped in comparison to the French and lost the war resulting in Dahomey being added to France’s colonial territories in West Africa.

This defeat also signified the disintegration of the Dahomian army and thus the women who the Europeans had referred to as the ‘Dahomey Amazons’. The last surviving Mino is thought to have been a woman named Nawi who died in 1979.

Someone needs to make a sci-fi animated fantasy or make a comic about or inspired by these women.

(sources 1, 2, 3)

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All Africa, All the time.

Source: dynamicafrica

23rd March 2014

Photo with 3 notes

Holi Hai! Repost from @insideready

Holi Hai! Repost from @insideready

22nd March 2014

Photoset reblogged from creative commess with 624 notes

ahauntedhunter:

magictransistor:

Leah Gordon; ‘Kanaval' Vodou, Politics and Revolution on the Streets of Haiti (Soul Jazz Books), 2010.

Belle Bagay!!!

Source: magictransistor

22nd March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Anaya Jahzara with 488,228 notes

unsolnosilumina:

Holi, the Hindu festival of colour. (x)

Source: ruineshumaines

21st March 2014

Photo with 2 notes

The evil King Hiranyakashipur plotted with his sister Holika to destroy his son Prahalad for his devotion to Lord Vishnu. But Holika end up getting bun. #holikadahan #holi #phagwa #trinidad

The evil King Hiranyakashipur plotted with his sister Holika to destroy his son Prahalad for his devotion to Lord Vishnu. But Holika end up getting bun. #holikadahan #holi #phagwa #trinidad

Tagged: holikadahanphagwaholitrinidad

21st March 2014

Video reblogged from DYNAMIC AFRICA with 84 notes

dynamicafrica:

As South Africa marks its annual commemoration of the tragic Sharpeville Massacre that occurred on March 21st, 1960, as Human Rights Day, we remember a more recent event that shocked the nation and has caused a series of uproar and protests as a result.

The Marikana miners’ strike took place at a mine owned by Lonmin in the Marikana area, close to Rustenburg, in August 2012.

What resulted was a series of violent incidents between the South African Police Service, Lonmin security, the leadership of the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) and strikers themselves, which resulted in the deaths of 44 people, the majority of whom were striking mineworkers killed on 16 August. At least 78 additional workers were also injured on 16 August. The total number of injuries during the strike remains unknown. In addition to the Lonmin strikers, there has been a wave of wildcat strikes across the South African mining sector. [x]

Above is a clip from the recently released ‘Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom’ that partially demonstrates what took place in Sharpeville on this day in 1960.

In this video, Archbishop Desmond Tutu discusses his reaction to the heinous event that took place 54 years ago at one point saying, “I remember it as a moment where you realized that black life was cheap”.

Further reading & viewing: Robert Sobukwe - founder & leader of the Pan-African Congress in South Africa that led the march against Pass Laws in Sharpeville.

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