Writer. Trouble-Maker. Mango Enthusiast.

19th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from FREE THINKER SOUL REBEL with 20,231 notes

welaughandplay:

america-wakiewakie:

Heartbreaking photos show the first day back to school in Gaza. Many students did not return.

(Photo Credit: Shehab News Agency)

my heart hurts.

Source: america-wakiewakie

18th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Dark Matter with 11,021 notes

Source: tuggliv

18th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from this isn't happiness. with 3,377 notes

nevver:

Astronomy Photographer of the Year winners

7th September 2014

Photo with 5 notes

Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
Mother whose children are the fish
Who inhabit the primordial waters
Mother whose salt runs in our veins
Able to give life when ours has drained
Mother who lives in our tears
Revealing yourself in both our darkest and happiest moments
Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
Your curves wind like the rivers that sculpt their travels in stone
Even mountains can not stop you on your journey
There is no obstacle you can not circumvent,
Nothing that can block your way
Even the hardest and strongest
Will give way, or be overtaken
Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
Without you
We can not live
Without you
We can not thrive
Without you
We can not survive
Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
May you provide us with health
Ase
May you provide us with wealth
Ase
May you provide us with someone to share our lives
Ase
May you provide us with children
Ase
May you provide us with longevity
Ase
May you provide us with wisdom
Ase
May you provide us with peace #yemaya #yemoja #cuba #yoruba #trinidad #orisa #givethanks #ase

Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
Mother whose children are the fish
Who inhabit the primordial waters
Mother whose salt runs in our veins
Able to give life when ours has drained
Mother who lives in our tears
Revealing yourself in both our darkest and happiest moments
Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
Your curves wind like the rivers that sculpt their travels in stone
Even mountains can not stop you on your journey
There is no obstacle you can not circumvent,
Nothing that can block your way
Even the hardest and strongest
Will give way, or be overtaken
Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
Without you
We can not live
Without you
We can not thrive
Without you
We can not survive
Ase o Iya mi Yemoja!
May you provide us with health
Ase
May you provide us with wealth
Ase
May you provide us with someone to share our lives
Ase
May you provide us with children
Ase
May you provide us with longevity
Ase
May you provide us with wisdom
Ase
May you provide us with peace #yemaya #yemoja #cuba #yoruba #trinidad #orisa #givethanks #ase

Tagged: asecubayemayaorisayorubayemojagivethankstrinidad

5th September 2014

Photo with 3 notes

Part of Eintou’s cute but bizarre Tillah collage. She’s been my number one fan since I managed to survive being born although the doctors said I was a goner. #mother #givethanks

Part of Eintou’s cute but bizarre Tillah collage. She’s been my number one fan since I managed to survive being born although the doctors said I was a goner. #mother #givethanks

Tagged: givethanksmother

4th September 2014

Link reblogged from words and seeds with 94 notes

Nine years after Katrina, New Orleans’ Voodoo community is rebuilding →

hoodoo-seed:

Last Friday marked the 9th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the natural disaster that killed almost 2,000 people and displaced 400,000 people, most of them low-income African-Americans and people of color. This tragedy left a hole in the city of New Orleans and exposed the legacy of our country’s at times sickening racism, hurting diverse and rich communities that we rarely hear about in mainstream media.

One of those was the Voodoo or Vodou community. Before Hurricane Katrina hit, there were about 2,500 practitioners in New Orleans. Today, there are closer to 350. 

In Newsweek, Stacey Anderson writes about the history of the smaller — but thriving — community of Voodoo practitioners today.

“Despite its reputation for vengeful hexes and black magic, Haitian voodoo is a peaceful and generally optimistic religion. It encourages strong family and community bonds and regular offerings to the thousands of spirits who aid all aspects of life, from business deals to romances.

[…]

Both [Haitian and New Orleans] voodoo are monotheistic (the highest god is Bondyè, the “good lord”), are mostly oral- instead of text-based and celebrate thousands of cosmic and natural spirits (akin to Catholicism’s saints). Participants are, and historically have been, mostly lower-income. Creoles and local slaves in the 18th century followed aspects of voodoo; so did slaves in pre-Civil War New Orleans during their Sunday dances at Congo Square. Voodoo influence grew stronger during the Haitian Revolution of 1791, when thousands of Africans and Haitians immigrated to the city. The earliest roots of voodoo date back approximately 6,000 years to Benin, West Africa, and an estimated 60 million people practice it worldwide.”

Anderson goes on to detail that the disaster has forced the two strains of Voodoo — Haitian Vodou and New Orleans Voodoo — to support each other through the rebuilding process. Now, there are more inter-community gatherings, even as old rivalries and debates continue.

We can only hope that this resilient community manages to rebuild itself in the face of environmental racism, income inequality, and a legacy of colonization. Voodoo — and other Afro-descendent religions throughout the Americas — has dealt with more than its fair share of racism, stigma, and violence. I find this particularly sad, not just because religions like Voodoo, Santería, Candomblé and Umbanda are living examples of resistance against colonialism and white supremacy, but also because they are well known for being particularly inclusive of women. Afro-Latinx religions generally value women as priestesses alongside men (or even above men), and many see sexuality as a human trait to be celebrated.

Not only that, but Afro-Latinx religious deities (known as Orishas or Loa in Haitian Vodou) include a host of powerful and complex female figures. Meet Oshun, the Orisha of love and the river, to whom the most recent Feministing Jamz video was dedicated. Or Yemanjá, the Orisha of the ocean and motherhood, who got a quiet shout-out in Beyoncé’s song “Blue.”

For many women around the world, Voodoo or Candomblé or Santería provide communities where their skin color is considered beautiful and ancient, and where their gender is empowering, not limiting. It’s an opportunity to transcend the oppressions that still affect so many, and connect with a force more powerful than bigotry and greed.

*Spelling of the Orixás’/Orishas’ names varies between country and language.

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Native American News with 50 notes

nativeamericannews:

Full blood? Half blood? There are ways that you can find out if you came from Native American ancestry. http://bit.ly/XbCE8E

nativeamericannews:

Full blood? Half blood? There are ways that you can find out if you came from Native American ancestry. http://bit.ly/XbCE8E

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Native American News with 108 notes

nativeamericannews:

Certain things catch your eye, but pursue only those that capture your heart. 

nativeamericannews:

Certain things catch your eye, but pursue only those that capture your heart. 

2nd September 2014

Photo with 3 notes

Tonight in the Caribbean Yard campus: food, lime and talk with Haitian drummer/dancer couple Sanba Zao and Mireille Marcelin who’ve been in Trinidad conducting workshops this week.  #rawlegibbons #trinidad #culture #jouvayayiti #lloydbestinstitute

Tonight in the Caribbean Yard campus: food, lime and talk with Haitian drummer/dancer couple Sanba Zao and Mireille Marcelin who’ve been in Trinidad conducting workshops this week. #rawlegibbons #trinidad #culture #jouvayayiti #lloydbestinstitute

Tagged: jouvayayiticulturerawlegibbonslloydbestinstitutetrinidad

28th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Native American News with 81 notes

nativeamericannews:

In Woodland Indian rituals, ceremonies, and religious observances, tobacco is the unifying thread of communication between humans and the spiritual powers. http://bit.ly/1lUhubC

nativeamericannews:

In Woodland Indian rituals, ceremonies, and religious observances, tobacco is the unifying thread of communication between humans and the spiritual powers. http://bit.ly/1lUhubC